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Secluded N.B. island for sale for $3.75 M

Secluded N.B. island for sale for $3.75 M

 

An uninhabited island of deep woods, sheltered coves, dramatic rock ledges and swimming beaches is a boy's dream. The 270-degree water views, gated lane and 1,000 feet of shoreline would appeal to many adults, too, especially those who like their real estate nice and natural.
 
 

An uninhabited island of deep woods, sheltered coves, dramatic rock ledges and swimming beaches is a boy's dream. The 270-degree water views, gated lane and 1,000 feet of shoreline would appeal to many adults, too, especially those who like their real estate nice and natural.

Photograph by: For Kate Wallace, New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal

Secluded N.B. island for sale for $3.75 M. 710 words, with 361 in optional trims.

EDS: Moves News and Business.

By Kate Wallace

New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal

SAINT JOHN, N.B. — An uninhabited island of deep woods, sheltered coves, dramatic rock ledges and swimming beaches is a boy's dream.

The 270-degree water views, gated lane and 300 metres of shoreline would appeal to many adults, too, especially those who like their real estate nice and natural.

As a child, Sandy Robertson would row over from Millidgeville, a riverfront community in Saint John's north end, to play in the fort he and a friend had built on the island that now bears his name.

Robertson's Point is for sale for $3.75 million, which puts it near the pinnacle of property prices in New Brunswick.

It is second only to a $12-million, 114-acre listing in Drury Cove, although it is more likely that that property will be broken into five- and 10-acre estates, rather than become the domain of a single buyer, as the island will.

Last year, a 110-acre tract with about 800 metres of ocean waterfront near St. Martins went for $1.2 million, a new record for a piece of residential land sold in the Saint John area through the MLS system.

There are also private and exclusive deals, whose figures are not available.

The Robertson property is also special in that it offers island living without the headaches of, well, island living.

"In North America when you buy an island, you can only get to them by water usually," said Katherine Bacon, the real-estate agent who has the listing. "But this one has an actual roadway and a causeway and you can just drive on and off as you wish."

That also eliminates the usual hassles of building on an island, where all tools and materials must be transported by barge or aircraft.

Robertson bought the property in 1983. "I had always dreamed about it," he said earlier this week, as he offered a walking tour of the property along winding gravel paths he has made. He pointed out deer tracks and woodpecker boreholes and an old pine tree so big two people couldn't encircle it with their arms.

A construction-industry businessman and real-estate developer, Roberston linked island to land with a quarter-mile causeway after buying the property.

While most islanders must get their electricity by windmill and other off-the-grid sources, Robertson ran protected power and telephone lines underground.

It feels far from the city, but the regional hospital and the University of New Brunswick's Saint John campus are nearby. It is less than 10 minutes' drive to King Square, in the heart of Saint John.

"That's all very rare," Bacon said. "Normally on an island, you're going to be very remote." Off the island's furthest tip, where the water drops off steeply, sailboats from the nearby Royal Kennebecasis Yacht Club pass all summer long.

"No matter where you are, there's a different view," Robertson said.

Some days, he'll go out after work to relax. Eight years ago, he had a birthday party on the island for 200 guests.

"I've sat down here and just watched the stars some nights," he said.

Robertson and his wife were going to build a house on the island, but their plans changed as they got older.

While he clearly loves this rocky, wooded island, it is his retirement fund.

"Some people have pensions, I've got property," he said.

The listing isn't new. It has been on the market for at least three years. But Bacon doesn't seem fazed by the wait.

"With this price-point of property in New Brunswick, that would not be uncommon. Any home over $1 million in New Brunswick, it's not uncommon for them to be more than a year."

She has marketed it to affluent buyers worldwide in the duPont Registry, a magazine carried by international airlines in their first-class cabins and lounges.

She has had inquiries from Italy and elsewhere in Europe, and from British Columbia and Montreal.

One potential buyer, a music video producer from the West Coast who owns several homes around the world, came to see it.

"He thought the price was excellent," Bacon said. "He was considering purchasing an island, so for him to have an island with a causeway, he thought it was a very good price point.

SOURCE:New Brunswick Telegraph Journal